Mini Felted Lanscape Brooches…Stunning Detail!

Miniature Felted Landscapes by Lisa Jordan of Lil Fish Studios on www.livingfelt.com/blog

For our FELTED LANDSCAPES week, Lisa Jordan of Lil’ Fish Studios shared her miniature felted landscape brooches on our facebook page. They got lots of love and attention!!

Lisa writes, “I make mini needle-felted landscapes – the scenes are just over an inch wide – which I then fit into a handmade wood brooch base. I consider them like little postcards of places I’ve gone and would like to go.”

You can follow her on facebook: Lil Fish Studios 

Wet and Needlefelted Wall Hanging Mushroom House

Brenda Milligan's Felted Wall Hangings

Wet and Needle Felted Gnome House

These felted wall hangings by Brenda Milligan are fabulous! The background is wet felted, then she needle felts the picture on to them. The texture in this little gnome home is just exquisite! The colors remind me of Living Felt Merino Cross Scenic Vista pack.

Wet and Needle Felted Vine Wall Hanging

 

The flowers on this vine were wet felted, then Brenda, who lives in Vermont and has been a long time Living Felt customer, needle felted them to the background. She embroidered the stems and flowers to, “make the path stand out.” Looking at it is such a Blue Delight!

 

Wet and Needlefelted Wall Hanging Mushroom House

 

Brenda’s inspiration comes from a love of gnomes and country gardens- you can tell she has a garden of her own based on the lovely detail in this mushroom house! The mushroom, Brenda tells us, is actually knitted first and then she needle felted it to her background. Here she has created a little Fairy Hollow  of her own!

Thank you for sharing your amazing creations with us Brenda! We hope to see more soon! :)

 

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An Expression of the Seasons

Dorie Ellzey Blesoff  created these four panels to correspond to the meaning of the seasons.

Each panel represents one season, and the time of day/night that most closely connects to my feeling of that season.  I created them all in the same location, but a different season, over the course of a year and a half.  Each panel has features that resemble the geographic area in which I created them (woods, lake, paths), yet each one has its own design based on the feeling of that season.

Winter = Reflection
Spring = Reawakening
Summer = Renewing
Fall = Releasing

 

She explains her process and inspiration. With the exception of winter, she created these pieces outdoors.

1. “As above, so below,” starts in the sky for winter (pearls sewn in) are also seen as sparkles on the water, or the colors of the sunrise in spring are also seen in the colors of the flowers on the ground, etc.  

2. The time of day corresponding to the season, so winter is night, fall is twilight, spring is sunrise and summer is high noon.

 

Dorie was encouraged to be creative from an early age.  She’s done pottery, carving (on pottery and wood), and she is primarily a musician – singer/song-writer since the age of 12.  Her CD’s are available through her website.  www.dorieLZblesoff.com

Dorie explains her move towards felting:

I learned to felt as part of a special retreat in Western Ireland in 2008, to help us integrate our experience of each day.  I have experimented a bit since then, and discovered this landscape felting two years ago.  I have had fun buying roving from people who raise their own alpacas and sheep, and finding wonderful colors with which to express the colors of each season.

 

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Ronda Loyer – To Create is to Live

Ronda Loyer has been a floral designer for 34 years. She had her own shop for 12 years, where she sold not only floral designs but all types of her artwork.

I have won best in show 5 times, and countless best in category. I won second place in a CDHM miniature contest for a fairy house. I work in many mediums in my art work, and always look for something new to try. To create is to live.

Ronda’s felting is diverse and inspiring. She says this about the featured image, “Under the Sea”:

“Under The Sea is a one of a kind needle felted picture done with various kinds of wool. What a coral reef looks like in my minds eye! Weeds and anemone’s sway among the coral. There is a Clown fish hiding in his favorite anemone. He is not attached so he can come out and moved somewhere else if the mood strikes you!”

“Water is shimmery shades of greens into purple to blue. Angelina film adds some sparkle. Framed in my favorite two colors of periwinkle blue backing and a suede purple mat. Measures 14″x18″ It is very 3 dimensional, would look best framed without glass, or in a shadowbox.”

Above, a very colorful hand needle felted picture with a swaying Palm Tree at sun set. The tree extends outside the edge of the mat board it is mounted on. The felt background measures 9″x11″ the mat board measures 11″x14.”

Below, a handmade wool seascape is needle felted on wool background. “Headin In” shows an approaching storm and the need to get back to shore. The sky is done in a very stormy blue, and is reflected in the dark water of the sea. The use of angelina film creates a subtle shimmer, and wool yarn creates breaking waves. There are beach grasses on the sand. It is very dimensional and mounted on a mat board, then framed with another one. Measures 13″x16″ and can be matted to a different size if need be. One of a kind.

Ronda’s felted paintings tell stories as dimensional as the artwork itself, and we like that it is interactive, touchable, and changeable so that the owner of these pieces can make the story his or her own!

See More of Ronda on Etsy:

Enchanted Path

A Hopeless Romantic

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The Stunning Portraits of Jan Waller

An Artist to Watch

Emerging artists often bring us the most inspiring works of art, and emerging felting artist, Jan Waller, is the perfect example of this. She’s from the UK, but has recently moved to Michigan with her husband. Prior to leaving her home country she ran a crafting business with a friend, and before that, she was a secondary school art teacher.

Jan tells us that she originally trained as a sculptor, but after her second child was born, she became depressed, and her husband thought getting back to art was the perfect cure. He bought her a day of felting lessons with Britain’s celebrated artist, Gillian Harris – also known as Gillian GladRag.

Jan started out felting small pieces with a crafting approach in mind. She made shoes, bags and corsages to sell. She continued to draw and paint people, but she never showed any of her work because she felt her art was going nowhere. She began to felt landscapes while living in Australia. She took a few commissions and really enjoyed it.

Now that she’s in the U.S., Jan feels she’s finding her felting niche. She’s started using needle felting to add detail and different texture to her wet felting. She has also begun to draw into the felts with a free motion machine embroidery.

This adds definition and a sculptural quality to the work,” she says.

I started to incorporate figures into my landscapes,” she continues.

Her triptych, entitled “Nesting” was exhibited with the Ann Arbor FiberArts Guild. It included the pieces, “Birds,” “Hornets,” and “Squirrel.” She says, “I like to tell personal stories in a way that makes them look like they are from a story book. I like to use animals and plant life in my images, too.

Her piece called “The Washing Line” is a sketch piece submitted for the ArtPrize 2012 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. It has been accepted, and it can be seen at http://www.artprize.org/jan-waller/2012/the-washing-line. The idea comes from a song called “Town Called Malice.”

The line refers to women hanging their old love letters out on a washing line to dry,” she explains.

The final piece involves a large wall hanging of a girl hanging letters on a line in a landscape and then running from the wall hanging, there is a felted washing machine with individually hand felted and embroidered love letters pegged to it that can be taken down and read.

I’m constantly asked how I make my felts as most people are unfamiliar with the process and can’t figure out how it looks like a painting but with cloth. I now tell customers that I paint with fibers. When I’m building up flesh colors, I am laying down the tiniest piece of fluff, but the fiber acts like watercolors laid over one another,” she says.

Jan works predominantly with merino and silk fibers; at times combining recycled fabrics and mixed media.

I like to embellish my imagery with embroidery. My work explores themes of womanhood, love, loss, relationships and home.

Jan Waller is one artist that is poised to make a great impact on the art world. Follow her at www.lovemakethink.com.

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A Natural at Felting from the Beginning

Jo Schram is 66 years young, and she was a natural at felting from the very beginning. Although she doesn’t wet felt, she creates stunning landscapes that have been featured in the annual Illinois Craftworks juried show. Jo says, “I had no idea what I was doing. I knew you needed barbed needles, wool roving and felt.”

She started felting 5 years ago with regular felt she purchased at a craft store. She eventually discovered Living Felt and bought a foam base and also, a brush base.

She began to realize she could incorporate some of the hundreds of yarns and specialty fibers she had accumulated from her scrapbooking days.

I liked the way they looked and could envision them as flowers, shrubs, fields, etc. by punching them into my felt base.

I paint with the wools, trying to pay attention to shading, etc.

Jo likes her very first felting so much that she refuses to sell it. She liked the way it turned out so much that she has continued to make hundreds of landscapes.  She tries to make them as realistic as possible, thus lending a fantasy quality to her work.

Jo says she’s done some 3D felting but, “I stick myself too much!

She recently purchased a felting machine and managed to break all the needles on day two.  She said it was an expensive mistake and just recently ordered more.

She has a great deal of admiration for the artists who do the dyeing and painting of the wool. “The colors they obtain are amazing.” Jo also does pastels, and created this Otter.

Currently, Jo lives in the East Bay, San Francisco. Her works are for sale at the Berry Patch in Pleasanton, CA, and she also has at Etsy shop. She advises that her best works are in Pleasanton.