Birds of a Feather Exhibit: Buff Orpington Hen

Felted Buff Orpington Hen by Kim Mahlbacher featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Buff Orpington Hen, Kim Mahlbacher

“This is one of my fun and silly felted chickens inspired by my own fun and silly chickens. Love their fluffy bloomers, chatty personalities and general silliness.

I fed them cranberries “once!” out on the back porch and now they all gather there and tap on the glass door waiting for more. And yes, I give in!”

Kim Mahlbacher, Oregon
fb: Heirloom Croft Art in Wool

Birds of a Feather Exhibit: Hoary Redpoll, Chickadee, Cedar Waxwing, and Emu Chick

Felted Hoary Redpoll Bird by Jen Cookson featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Hoary Redpoll, Jen Cookson

“I first spotted this bird in another regions of BC while out walking on a cold winter’s day after a sad event, and he cheered me up just looking at him. One day, I saw fattest Hoary Redpoll I’d ever seen; he defied gravity! I laughed so hard I decided to make one. I learned they are an Arctic bird that always travels to BC from Greenland.

Making birds has healed my heart and every time I make one I dive in and learn as much as I can about that particular type. It’s a joyful practice!”

Jen Cookson, Canada
www.jencookson.ca

felted-chickadee-bird

Little Chickadee, Debbie Penley

“This little chickadee was a prototype for a project with my local Audubon Society. I chose the chickadee because it is a fairly recognizable bird, and it is well liked. :)”

Debbie Penley, Pennsylvania

Felted Cedar Waxwing Bird by Karen Englebretson featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Cedar Waxwing, Karen Englebretson

“A few years ago we planted serviceberry trees, Amelancier, to attract more birds to our yard. Summer 2017 was the first year we had abundant fruit and a flock of cedar waxwings took notice.

For a few days they circled our property and dropped into the trees every few hours to feed. I put a chair in the driveway and spent an afternoon studying and photographing them, then felted a number of waxwing ornaments, and even a pair of life size birds. “

Karen Englebretson, Minnesota
etsy: KJE Felties

Felted Emu Chick Bird by Tammy Saulnier featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Emu Chick, Tammy Saulnier

“This sculpture has a wire armature and is poseable. He also has pre-made eyes, and polymer clay beak and claws.

I couldn’t help it, I saw an emu chick and had to make it. For me it is like the ugly duckling story just in reverse..lol”

Tammy Saulnier, Canada
Dragon Song Studio

Birds of a Feather Exhibit: Felted “Terror Bird”

Felted Terror Bird by Rachel Carter featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

“‘Terror Bird’ is the colloquialism for a group of extinct, large, carnivorous, flightless birds that were the apex of predators in South America until about 2 million years ago.

Ever since learning about them as a child, I have had a great fascination for these creatures. On a whim I decided to make this one, and had fun taking the creative liberty with the coloration and feathers. My sculpture gleefully came to be with a big personality to match his fearsome reputation.”

Rachel Carter, Oregon
www.rockandflowerfelt.com

Birds of a Feather Exhibit: Red Crested Cardinal

Red Crested Cardinal by Diana Matusik Densmore featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog.

Red Crested Cardinal, Diana Matusik Densmore

“In 2012, my mom and stepfather married in Hawaii … there was one moment where we were sitting outside at a restaurant, and one of these little goofballs bounced up to us, cocked its head, and just gave us the most endearing little look. We had a good laugh from that character, considering we were also watching roosters chase each other up and down the adjacent golf course. Little dinosaurs, they are … It’s a sort of ‘stylized realism,’ a combo of realistic design and cartoon-ish simplicity”

wire armature, core wool, MC-1 Batting, NZ Corriedale in crest

Diana Matusik Densmore, Florida
facebook: framedandfelted

Birds of a Feather Exhibit: Barn Owl Family

Barn Owl Family by Linda Brodersen featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog.

Barn Owl Family, Linda Brodersen

“This barn owl family was a commissioned project made for a friend. The pictures were captured by a video camera set up in her brother’s barn. The babies were in a separate picture which I incorporated into the parent’s picture. This portrait is the second one I made at the request of my husband. The first one took 40 hours to make, this one took 20.”

Barn Owl Family by Linda Brodersen featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Needle Felted on Linen.
All MC-1 was used from the fabulous Living Felt, Angora blend for babies.
Hand beading was added to the feathers.

Linda Brodersen, Michigan
etsy: IWoolieFeltLikeIt