Adorable Felt Dog Portrait

Felted Dog Portrait by Sonja Weeks Oswalt featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

It is NO WONDER that Sonja is getting a waiting list for commissions! This little angel just stole our hearts!

Finn the Dog featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

“Meet Finn. He is a chi-chinese crested mix. Left at the shelter because his owners thought he was ugly. I think he is awesome.” ~Sonja shared he is no longer at the shelter … now with a friend 🙂
– Sonja Weeks Oswalt, Tennessee

Stunning Felt Dog Portrait

Felted Dog Pet Portrait by Doris Waschinski featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

This portrait is nothing short of stunning! Visit our fb friends group for pictures of her work in process.

“My portrait of my Zima is finished. It feels so good to have this almost living memorial. I can pet her 🙂 Thank you Living Felt for the inspiring tutorials. I would never have attempted this without your help.”

– Doris Waschinski, Canada

Felt Portrait Family Heirloom

Felted Family Grandparents Portrait by Sonja Weeks Oswalt featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

This is sure to become a cherished family heirloom.

“Grandma and grandpa. These are my husband’s grandparents, both of whom have left us. We are having a memorial service for his grandmother this weekend, on their anniversary, so I felted this portrait for my in-laws.”

– Sonja Weeks Oswalt, Tennessee
etsy: Conspiracy of Love

Stunning Felted Pig Portrait

Felted Pig Portrait by Beth Walker featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Beth’s Animal Portraits in Felted Wool are So Stunning! You can definitely see some MC-1 Batting in this pic, background is wool felt.

“I think I’m calling this one finished. This is a rescued pig who passed away, and was the face of the sanctuary.. I did this for the owner and I hope I did her justice.”

– Beth Walker, Alabama
Yarn Gypsy Fiber Arts
fb: YG Fiber Arts

New Colors in Flesh Tone Wool

Flesh Tone Needle Felting Wool featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

What’s New About These Awesome Colors of our MC-1 Felting Batts?

* Our previous color called “flesh tone” is now named SAND. We know and love that there are so many colors for skin tones, and for a long time we have been wanting to make this change. We are now pleased to show you the colors we think are best used as a base color for “flesh tones” in dolls and portraits.

* SOON – we will have for you some brand new DIY Workshops for needle felting dolls and faces and you will see many of these shades used on those dolls with more detailed features.

* NOW – we have a new sub-category for flesh tones in our MC-1 where you can quickly access these particular colors. (on the MC-1 page, look for the flesh tones subcategory)

See all the MC-1 Flesh Tones

Realistic Needle-Felted Pet Portrait

Pet Portrait by Lauren Beach featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Lauren is another of our felting friends we like to follow on Instagram and who sells her work on Etsy. She always has fun images of her work like this little beauty – what lovely coloring!

“This pet portrait was a custom order from one of my customers. It was unnerving trying to recreate not just any animal, but someone’s beloved pet! But after about 5 or 6 hours of tinkering, I was happy with the result.

I used only your fast-felting batts and a yellow and green needle from your shop.

I had previously been using a black wool with longer fibers and the fast felting black wool was a dream!”

– Lauren Beach
etsy: SewnbytheBeach
SewnbytheBeach on Instagram

The Stunning Portraits of Jan Waller

An Artist to Watch

Emerging artists often bring us the most inspiring works of art, and emerging felting artist, Jan Waller, is the perfect example of this. She’s from the UK, but has recently moved to Michigan with her husband. Prior to leaving her home country she ran a crafting business with a friend, and before that, she was a secondary school art teacher.

Jan tells us that she originally trained as a sculptor, but after her second child was born, she became depressed, and her husband thought getting back to art was the perfect cure. He bought her a day of felting lessons with Britain’s celebrated artist, Gillian Harris – also known as Gillian GladRag.

Jan started out felting small pieces with a crafting approach in mind. She made shoes, bags and corsages to sell. She continued to draw and paint people, but she never showed any of her work because she felt her art was going nowhere. She began to felt landscapes while living in Australia. She took a few commissions and really enjoyed it.

Now that she’s in the U.S., Jan feels she’s finding her felting niche. She’s started using needle felting to add detail and different texture to her wet felting. She has also begun to draw into the felts with a free motion machine embroidery.

This adds definition and a sculptural quality to the work,” she says.

I started to incorporate figures into my landscapes,” she continues.

Her triptych, entitled “Nesting” was exhibited with the Ann Arbor FiberArts Guild. It included the pieces, “Birds,” “Hornets,” and “Squirrel.” She says, “I like to tell personal stories in a way that makes them look like they are from a story book. I like to use animals and plant life in my images, too.

Her piece called “The Washing Line” is a sketch piece submitted for the ArtPrize 2012 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. It has been accepted, and it can be seen at http://www.artprize.org/jan-waller/2012/the-washing-line. The idea comes from a song called “Town Called Malice.”

The line refers to women hanging their old love letters out on a washing line to dry,” she explains.

The final piece involves a large wall hanging of a girl hanging letters on a line in a landscape and then running from the wall hanging, there is a felted washing machine with individually hand felted and embroidered love letters pegged to it that can be taken down and read.

I’m constantly asked how I make my felts as most people are unfamiliar with the process and can’t figure out how it looks like a painting but with cloth. I now tell customers that I paint with fibers. When I’m building up flesh colors, I am laying down the tiniest piece of fluff, but the fiber acts like watercolors laid over one another,” she says.

Jan works predominantly with merino and silk fibers; at times combining recycled fabrics and mixed media.

I like to embellish my imagery with embroidery. My work explores themes of womanhood, love, loss, relationships and home.

Jan Waller is one artist that is poised to make a great impact on the art world. Follow her at www.lovemakethink.com.