Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt – Bold, Beautiful Nuno Felt

Nuno Felt Scarf by Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt

Joni Cornell first discovered felting in the year 2000 while studying at the Steiner School Seminar in Melbourne to become a Steiner teacher.  It was a two year course, and year one involved self-development through arts. Joni shares that Steiner saw art as spiritual activity, and her introduction to the craft came about like this, “…one sunny warm afternoon Jillian Somerville-Finch came in and got us to make a felt ball, using fleece, yarn and stuffing it all into a stocking to ‘felt’ using warm water and soap. I wasn’t quite sure what I was doing but it was a great excuse to be outside. I finished the exercise and found that my ball had a major crack in it like the fault line that runs under California.”

While the teacher’s course did not include any more felting in that year, Joni was able take more classes with Jillian over the next few years. Rather than continuing on the path of becoming a Steiner teacher, Joni decided to retrain in the use of arts in the applications of education, research and therapy.

JONI-CORNELL NUNO FELTING A BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL SCARF

photo courtesy of Barbara Oehring

What Joni enjoys most about felting she summed up in one word, “Colour.”

I like being in the fields of colour and just playing with the roving and silk fibres. So when working on a big piece the laying out is the most fun for me. But also in the early years, when I was studying to be a therapist, I found comfort in felting on the few occasions when I did a workshop with Jillian, to make a wrap, a pair of slippers, a skirt. Joseph Beuys (the ‘social sculptor’, who incidentally was influenced by Rudolf Steiner) used industrial felt in his happenings and installations and he suggested that there was an element about felt that was ‘warmth’ and this warmth is spiritual or evolutionary. I tend to agree. Beuys used felt as a magical and symbolic substance.”

Joni Cornell Home Scarf Nuno felted

Joni is particularly fond of Nuno Felting,  she calls her nuno felt
a strong yet fine laminated fabric using superfine merino and silk fibres.”

She also feels the finer felt suits the more temperate climate in her home of Australia.

Joni  does not resort to the use of powered equipment such as an electric sander, washing machine or clothes dryer because she does not believe in highly distressing the felt. She also does not thump, or shock her fibers during the felting process. As a result, her process of making nuno felt is all work by hand, rolling and rubbing – quite a labor intensive process.

An eco-dyedd nuno felt wrap by Joni Cornell

JONI-CORNELL-Ecodyed Nuno-felt-jacket

After exploring eco-dyeing with the abundance of eucalyptus leaves on her property – she has concluded that she prefers the bright colors she gets from acid dyes and this year will return to producing more colourful felts again.

JONI CORNELL NUNO FELTED BATTLE COAT for Felt United 2010

“In making the ‘Battlecoat’ in 2010 when I called on 5 other artists to send in a depiction of a ‘scar’ or wound that I would felt into a coat, I was drawn to making something with meaning and with the participation of others. Working with felt for me is more than about ‘fashion’, or beauty, or churning out fast ‘little’ pieces as though in your own personal sweatshop to stock an Etsy store…the work can be therapeutic (even when the intention is not therapy) and it can be done as a participatory inquiry, where we come to know certain things about ourselves and the life world of others.”

JONI-CORNELL NUNO FELTED BATTLE COAT for Felt United 2010

Joni suffered an injury in 2013 that not only made it virtually impossible to sit or stand for several weeks, she was also unable to felt for over four months and the road to recovery has been slow. As a result, she is pacing herself and now making smaller pieces. She shares, “I’ve also resolved to restrict my output this year and make work which will make me happy.”

Joni’s first creative passion as a young person was print-making, she shares that she has always drawn and loves using pastels.
She also creates in collage and water color.

For those just getting started with felting, Joni offers,

“Enjoy the process, even though sometimes it may feel that you’re a launderer ;-). When I first started to make felt and even now I treat it like playing with colours and textures, and it’s always a thrill when it all comes together. Find those artists who inspire you and look at what it is you like about their work. One always needs somewhere to start and art begets other art. You may think you’re copying but there’s always an aspect of your work that becomes entirely ‘yours’ – your signature, because your touch will be different. Take a workshop, even from a maker who is not your idol as a felt maker. Take your time to learn, experiment and explore.”

Sound guidance, indeed.

Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt layout out silks for her nuno felt shawl

Joni is part of the Open Artists’ studio program in the Dandenongs where she lives, about 40 km outside of Melbourne. This involves opening her studio to the public for one weekend in April/May.  In 2013, 35 studios participated in the event which also includes a group exhibition held at Burrinja Cultural Centre which sponsors the event.

Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt wets out her nuno felt shawl

For the 2013 event, Joni decided to videotape the making Semi Circular Nuno Felt Shawl that
she was creating for the exhibition; the piece was eventually entitled “Ten Fabrics Gathering”.

Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt nuno felting by rubbing her piece on a solar pool cover

She posted the series of videos to Youtube, “as a kind of peek-a-boo” into her studio before the big event , and to share with others the  process of this very labor intensive art form.  This is a multi-part video that is a treat to watch. It will especially be interesting for those new to felting to see the size variation from start to finish to accommodate for shrinkage as a result of the felting process.

YOU CAN WATCH THE ENTIRE NUNO FELTING PROCESS VIDEO HERE:

Ten Fabrics Gathering, an artful nuno felt wrap by Joni Cornell

photo courtesy of Barbara Oehring

Joni has also shown at the Victorian Feltmakers Inc., and she participated in the Felted United virtual show in 2010,
when she made the collaborative piece entitled Battlecoat.

Joni Cornell of Wrapt in Felt models her Nuno Felt Mosaic Jacket

You can see lots more from Joni….but grab a cup to tea and get cozy.
….oh, and maybe grab your journal…and prepare to be INSPIRED and ENTICED!

http://jonicornell.blogspot.com.au

http://2013.openstudios.org.au/artists/joni-cornell

https://www.facebook.com/wraptinfelt

https://www.etsy.com/shop/WraptInFelt

 

New Born Photographers Discover Wooly Fluff!

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA – LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Meadow

New born photographers from coast to coast are discovering the pure, simple magic of Living Felt MC-1 Felting Batts and we love what they are doing with them! Some call  us looking for the wool “fluff” for new born props, because they have see the brilliant baby pics taken by their peers.

New Born Photographer Christy Wallis uses LIVING FELT MC-1 Batts, on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA –  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Sugar Plum

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Cotton

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA – LIVING FELT MC-1 Felting Batt Cotton

Christy Wallis  is a New Born Photographer in San Diego, California who works pure magic with our felting batts. She is a talented photographer who is trained to work with new born babies ensuring they are safe and supported during the shoots.

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Birch

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA – LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Birch

Christy was turned on to our batts by a fellow newborn photographer whom she admired, and we are hearing that she and others like our earthy color tones and our heathered batts. Since little babies are touching the wool, everyone loves that the fibers have been washed with an eco-friendly soap and have not been processed with harsh chemicals [the wool is non-carbonized]. The dyes are the same as used in everyday clothing and this wool is from  sheeps raised on US farms, it is dyed and carded right here in the USA.

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt

Christy Wallis Photography | new born | San Diego, CA – LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt boysenberry

While the use of the wool  in new born photography is not “felting”, it is a great way for someone who is a felter or a fiber artist to contribute their passions to a new baby in the family.

With just 2-4oz of our wool batting, the sweet new baby photos are accented with wonderful, natural fibers and textures.

Bachmanville Photography | new born  Orange County, CA | Living Felt MC-1 Batt Charcoal

Bachmanville Photography | new born Orange County, CA | Living Felt MC-1 Batt Charcoal

It is fun to see how different new born photographers are incorporating not only our wool batts for new baby pictures, but also other fiber art that has been knitted or woven.  Shara Bachman of Bachmanville Photography in Orange County, CA is another talented photographer indeed.  She books photo sessions for babies that are just days old.

Bachmanville Photography | new born Orange County, CA | Living Felt  Felting Supplies

Bachmanville Photography | new born Orange County, CA | Living Felt Felting Supplies

Brenda Anderson Photography | new born | Tavares, Florida -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Oatmeal

Brenda Anderson Photography | new born | Tavares, Florida – LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Oatmeal

Brenda Anderson is a new born photographer in Florida who also enjoys our wooly fluff as a prop for her photo shoots.

Jill Singer Photography new born Living Felt MC-1 Willow

Jill Singer Photography new born Ohio | Living Felt MC-1 Willow

Jill Singer used MC-1 Willow to create this precious bear bonnet for her new born photos.

Rhiannon Logsdon Photography | new born Austin, TX | Living Felt Wool Batts

Rhiannon Logsdon Photography | new born Austin, TX | Living Felt Wool Batts

Rhiannon Logsdon Photography | new born  Austin, Texas -  LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Olive

Rhiannon Logsdon Photography | new born Austin, Texas – LIVING FELT MC-1 Batt Olive

Rhiannon Logsdon creates wonderful and fantastical imagery for new borns, children and families. We love how she uses our wool with these baby photos.

If you are not near one of these talented women but would like your baby photographed with some of our felting batts, consider sharing this post with your new born photographer. They can start with as little as 2oz of our MC-1 Wool Batts.

Newborn Photographers Featured:
Christy Wallis –  San Diego, CA
Shara Bachman – Orange County, CA
Brenda Anderson – Tavaris, FL
Jill Singer – Canton, OH

Rhiannon Logsdon – Austin, TX

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl, featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Felted Clothing & Accessories – Fit for Fairies on Earth

82.6

We fell in love with the felted scarves, wrist warmers, jewelry and more by Angela Shannon!
Join us as we visit with her and explore more of her exquisite yet elemental felted apparel.

Approximately 8 years ago, Angela  discovered felt making through her love of trying new craft techniques She shares she is currently trying to teach herself micro macramé.

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl,  featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog
“I enjoy coming up with new designs, and so I tend to take an experimental approach, and I am not always certain of what I will make until I get started.  I am very happy to combine materials I have to hand  such as cotton fabrics and pieces of vintage lace into my felt work.  I also like to try out different kinds of fibres to see what changes they make to the texture of the felt. I hand dye my fibres using acid dyes which is a process I also very much enjoy.”

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl,  featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl,  featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

“I love the way that felt can mimic nature. I was very surprised when I first discovered this aspect of felting, and it is the main reason why I enjoy working in this medium.”

Angela says she loves felting scarves and shawls “because there is an infinite variety of possibilities, whether that is the colour combinations, shapes or textures. I also love making my forest cuffs because there always seems to be a new colour combination to try.”

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl,  featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

For her delightful felted pieces, Angela likes to work with merino tops, Wensleydale and Teeswater locks, and she also enjoys using Alpaca and silk fibers.

Where does she get her magical ideas?
“The woods and forest is where I derive my inspiration.”

Lovely felted clothing and accessories by Angela Shannon of Folk Owl,  featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog
Angela’s WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT to fellow artists and craft persons:
“Find something that you love creating that comes from the heart and others will love it too. Be prepared to work very hard and never give up on your ability to succeed.”

Shop with Angela in her Etsy shop https://www.etsy.com/ch-en/shop/folkowl

Follow her on facebook: Folk Owl on facebook

What Happens When Animator Discovers Needle Felting?

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog   

What happens when an animator discovers needle felting ? Drawings come to life in wool!

Allison Craig is a full-time animator and consummate doodler who found her way to the magic of felting her characters in wool. The first needle felt sculptures she ever saw were those of a past co-worker, who had also been featured on Living Felt for her unique creations.

“I think the first needle felt work I ever saw came from the amazing Steph Laberis. We actually worked together for a while at an animation studio in Boston called Soup2Nuts. Once we had each gone our own ways, I saw some of her needle felt work online and LOVED it. Finally, 2 years ago, I bought some startup supplies from Living Felt and gave it a shot.”

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog

“Being an animator, I’ve always been into character design and doodling different animals and ideas. Pair that with a guilty-pleasure love of stuffed animals, and this seemed like the perfect media for me to try. I love that it’s a 3 dimensional way to create a character; I have a lot of fun scultping (I did a bit of sculpey work back in college)”

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog
“The felt projects I create usually come from doodling in my sketchbook. Lately I’ve been doing a lot of projects for other people, so the idea might come from them, but I’ll put my own spin on the design. I think everything I’ve done has been an animal. I feel more comfortable doing animals than humans! Maybe someday I’ll challenge myself. I get inspiration from a lot of other animators and character designers. I follow a lot tumblrs and artists on facebook (and I try not to get sucked into internet browsing for TOO long, ha!).”

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog

“The majority of artwork that I do is for my fulltime job with Titmouse. I animate/layout/design in Flash and Photoshop on the computer. I use a Wacom Cintiq which allows you to draw with a stylus straight onto the monitor. So nice!! Otherwise, I’m doodling with pencils in my sketchbook. Felting is so nice because it gets me away from the computer but keeps me productive.”
What has been your most challenging project and what was challenging about it?

I think my most challenging project has been the Mia dog. Mostly because it was only my third felt and I was (and am) still trying to learn the best methods and tricks for doing certain things. I was also trying to use different mediums with that one – the resin cast eyes (thank you, Steph, for that tutorial!) and the collar, etc. I love how using different mediums in one piece can make it more textural and interesting.”
Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog

What is your “next big challenge”.or the project you are dreaming to do?
“I have a small obsession with unicorns and would LOVE to do a goofy, cartoony unicorn. “

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog
“Anyone can needle felt!! That is what’s so great about it. Everyone has a different style and different ideas, and it’s great to see the variety that comes from this form of art. And with modern day tech – it’s so easy to find a tutorial online that can help you overcome hurdles that you hit. I am SO happy to have discovered needle felting! Maybe you’ll fall in love with it too.”

Allison Craig Animations & Needle Felt on www.livingfelt.com/blog

SEE MORE FROM ALLISON:

tumblr (most recent work posted here):  http://allisonanimates.tumblr.com/
website: http://allisoncraig.com/

The Brilliant Felted Landscapes of Tracey McCracken Palmer

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Grazing the High Pasture

Take a moment to scroll through these gorgeous felted “paintings” by Tracey McCracken Palmer. They have such wonderful depth, color and interest — giving the viewer a feeling of a real place with a real story. You might find it hard to believe, but at the time of this article, Tracey has been felting less than 2 years.

We really enjoyed our time meeting with Tracey and getting to know her better. She is as sweet and humble as she is talented, and her distinct South Eastern accent is just delightful to listen to as she tells her story. Tracey says she has painted and drawn her entire life, and while she discovered felting after taking a needle felting class several years ago, she did not begin exploring the medium right away.

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Fly Me to The Moon

“I planned to invest in some wool and try it at home, but I was mainly painting in acrylic then and just never got around to it. Then in June of 2013, I saw Moy MacKay’s work on Facebook, and was completely blown away by her felted landscapes. She had just published her first book so I got it and learned her method of layering wool and wet felting landscapes.

Since then, while I’ve used her method of felting, I’ve also developed my own techniques to create my own style. She uses machine stitching and embroidery floss for much of her detail work and since I don’t sew, I needle felt all my details in with wool. Also her work is a bit more abstract, while I’m a detail freak and try to make it look as close to the real thing as possible. I wouldn’t want to copy her style anyway, but I am so thankful to have found her work, and the medium that I’ve been looking for my whole life – I just never knew what it was until now!”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Tracey McCracken Palmer gives demo on felting landscapes at Leaves and Twigs gallery

TRACEY SHARES HER METHOD FOR “HOW TO FELT LANDSCAPES”

“My process begins by layering different colors of dyed wool over a double layer of un-dyed wool to create a scene. Next, I wet the piece with hot soapy water and work it, pressing with my hands, turning and rolling it repeatedly in a bamboo or bubblewrap mat for over two hours until the friction of the rolling process binds the fibers together, creating felt. I then rinse the soap out of the felt and mat, and roll it again several times before letting it air dry.

After it is completely dry, I use needle felting to add more details to the landscape, using special needles which have notches along the shaft. The notches on the needles grab the layer of wool fibers which I have added, and tangle them with the inner layers as the needle enters the felt. Since the notches face down toward the tip of the needle, they do not pull the fibers back out as the needle exits the wool.

Each felted landscape is totally unique and made entirely by hand, using pure wool from Merino and Corriedale sheep, with silk and other natural fibers sometimes added as well.”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Borve Beach

“…my favorite thing from LF [Living Felt] is your merino cross batts, and by golly those batts are where it’s at!!!  Truly they are my most valued wools, because they make such great textures in leaves, and even rocks, and grasses, I can even card them a bit to make other color variations if I need to.”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Sycamore

Painting on canvas is quite a different medium, but Tracey really enjoys everything about the felting process of creating felted landscapes. “I love smelling and feeling the textures of different types of wool, and even picking out wee bits of burrs from some of the batts. I also love seeing the changes that occur each time I wet felt a piece, and I learn something from each one about how to best layer the colors and even the different types of wools to achieve what I’m wanting. But I think I enjoy adding the details with needle felting best, because I love the way one tiny wee bit of wool, either added or taken away can make such a huge difference!  Living Felt’s cross batts are so wonderful with bits of different colors, and I use them for all my trees, whether summer or autumn leaves.”

“I’m just so thrilled to have finally found the medium that truly fuels my creativity!”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Tanglewood Magic

For Tracey’s felted landscapes, she says inspiration is everywhere around her.
“The texture of the wool makes my landscapes almost 3-D, and I’m inspired by everything it seems! As I drive to work and back I see so many beautiful skies and farmland in the mountains here in western NC, and I keep my camera handy to capture it if I can, so I can add it to the list of scenes I want to felt. Skies, trees, water and misty mountains are my biggest inspirations.”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Tracey McCracken Palmer and Grazing the High Pasture Felt Painting

Tracey was kind of enough to share specifics of the fibers used in her work, and says the greatest majority of her fibers come from Living Felt. See below for colors in her felting palette

Tracey also creates in other mediums including graphite wash, acrylic,watercolor, and pastels. “I’ve dabbled with art my whole life, but let everyday life get in the way of really being serious about it until I found felting. I am now the driven artist I’ve always wanted to be, and I love my palette of wool!”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Roaring Fork Falls

Her Most Challenging Project to Date?

“…creating waterfalls, but the tussah silk I use from Living Felt makes wonderful water. I push the limits of felting with my landscapes all the time, to make them as realistic as I can, and learn a bit more from every one.”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Moondance

We asked Tracey about her “next big challenge” … or the project she is dreaming to do:
“Oh, I want to do so many things, and just wish I had more time to felt !!  I plan to do a close up of an owl, and a sheep, and other creatures, and I hope to create even more detailed landscapes and dramatic skies. I just keep adding things to my list of ‘Must Try To Felt That’ !!!”

a. Tracey McCracken Palmer talks about Felting Landscapes on www.LivingFelt.com/blog

Misty Highland Glen

Just by following her passion, Tracey is helping to bring felt and fiber art to the fine arts & crafts scene.
In 2014 Tracey was invited to hang a solo exhibit of her work in one of the branches of her local Public Library , which ran from January through March.

In June 2014 she was featured as the “Artist of the Month”  at Twigs & Leaves Gallery, where she sells her work. She has given several demonstrations of her felting technique over the past year at the gallery, and also at a “Quick Draw” event in Haywood County where she lives. Tracey was on the Haywood Art Studio Tour.

At time of our interview Tracey was hoping to  pass the second jury to become a member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild; and we are so happy to announce that she has been accepted! As a member, Tracey hopes to show her work and demonstrate at some of their galleries also.  And she exclaims, “I’m just getting started!!”

 

Tracey McCracken Palmer demonstrates felting a landscape on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Quick Draw demo

We asked Tracey what she might offer to those just getting into felting.
“I would encourage beginning felters to just go for it and give it a try. The best part of wet felting is that you can fix things that don’t come out just as you thought they would by adding a bit of needle felting after it dries. And, you can always pull the wool back off after you’ve needled it in, if it doesn’t suit you. It’s a very user friendly medium, and there are so many things one can make with felt.”

Tracey McCracken Palmer on Felting Landscapes with www.LivingFelt.com/blog

A Warm Welcome Awaits

We sincerely wish Tracey all the best, and don’t be surprised if you see a book of her own coming out one day…just remember, you heard it here first, oh, and buy it! 🙂

Tracey… You Are Brilliant! and Thank you for Felting With Us!

You can follow Tracey on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/BonnieblinkStudio

More work from Tracey on the Living Felt Blog

Needle Felted Picture Forest by Tracey Palmer featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Tracey uses a combination of Living Felt MC-1 Felting Batts, Merino Top, Merino Silk Blends, New Zealand Corriedale and other fibers. For the paintings in this post:

Living Felt MC-1 Merino Cross Batts: bamboo, bluegrass, buttercup, true olive, spruce, honeysuckle, foliage, meadow green, shire, birch, vintage brown, winter grey.

Merino Top: yellow, apricot, plum, chocolate, white, black, fir, bottle green, garden ivy, lima bean, olive, mint.

New Zealand Corriedale: cherub, lima, cocoa, candy, apricot, butterscotch, natural white, ice, sky, lagoon, royal, natural light.

Merino silk blends in Woodland for the sky in Moondance, and the water in Borve Beach.

For the tree in Misty Highland Glen, I used your Premium Mohair Locks in Emerald Forest, and of course tussah silk in both waterfalls and Moondance.

Felting Wild Life with Judy Titche

Judy Titche Needle Felted Animals Ducklings Turtle on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Judy Titche lives in Indiana and is a trained artist with a degree in painting and drawing. Her creative exploration, however, has moved her more toward 3D works which she really enjoys.  Her felted animals and the rich colors and textures in her scenes are utterly brilliant.

Judy Titche Needle Felted Animals Ducklings Turtle on www.livingfelt.com/blog

I have done a great deal of work in 3D mosaics. My current show at the Art Museum of Greater Lafayette is a combination of mosaics and fiber held together by the theme of animals.”

“I have always had a fascination with vintage fabric and needlework. I saw a photo of needle felted embellishment and I plunged in head first. I love to learn new art forms and I also like the challenge of pushing them to their/my limits. I like the little ”surprises” of wet felting and the variety of color in wool rovings.  Needle felting is both a challenging and unique sculpting medium.  I find the final form is also unique in its texture and detail.”

 

Judy Titche Felted Animals on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Judy considers “nature” to be her greatest inspiration. “Every day I am amazed at the beauty of nature. I think I captured some of that beauty in my baby duck piece, the Snowy Owl and the Cardinals in a Magnolia Tree.”

Judy Titche  Felted Owl  on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Judy shared that her greatest artistic challenges to date were around the felted snowy owl hanging in her current solo show.

“I think the Snowy Owl was the most challenging due to the armature I had to build to provide support for the life sized wings and body. Also the installation piece around the owl was quite challenging.  My vision was to create an ethereal setting for the owl to be flying through.  I was quite pleased with the final result.”

Judy Titche  Felted Owl  on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Next on her bucket list of “things to felt” is an installation representing several different jellyfish.

 Judy offers encouraging words to those just getting started:

 “Keep your eyes open and look, look, look. Train yourself to see detail and the numerous hidden treasures all around you.  There are innumerable textures and color combinations that are awe inspiring. Use what you see as  inspiration for your work.”

Judy Titche  Felted Owl  on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Judy shared her use of Living Felt Fibers and tools:        “I use Living Felt core wool for most of my 3D work.  I like the foam pads for needle felting and Merino wool for its softness and color variety.”

 Besides her current exhibit, you can see more of Judy’s eclectic style in her etsy shop: ReZoom

Needle Felted Mice, Cats and Whimsey

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Elena Covert is the art and soul behind NeighborKitty, a precious and engaging
shop on etsy, filled with delightful characters. We discovered the magic when she wrote
to us one day and said simply, “I am your customer, and this is my page on etsy.”
We are so glad she did!

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

We took the opportunity to learn more about her, and are happy to share Elena and her shop with you.

Elena shares,  “Felting is my true love. Month after month I work to improve my skills, I do not rush to make and sell the needle felted items. My goal is to make each piece as beautiful and with the greatest quality that makes both my buyer and myself happy.”

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Her creative explorations began very early on at the age of 7 with sewing. As she grew up, she added knitting, more advanced sewing, crochet, embroidery and later…felting.  She discovered felting when she wanted to learn to felt beads for a necklace, and this let to larger items such as the animals she sculpts now. Elena also creates in oven baked polymers and says that her “biggest challenge” has been to incorporate all of the mediums into one crafted item.

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Elena says that she enjoys needle felting because, “I find it very relaxing and allows me to take a small amount of wool and turn it into something with character and personality.” Elena “loves cats” and have two that provide her constant inspiration.

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

We asked Elena what her next big project will be, or what she is dreaming to do … as with many of us, the inspiration seems in constant flow,

she says, “I have “millions” of creative thoughts in my head, not sure what I will make tomorrow.”

 

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

Needle Felted Dolls Cats and Mice of Elena Covert NeighborKitty featured on www.livingfelt.com/blog

To others who are just getting started, Elena offers these encouraging words,

“Don’t be afraid to do what you like and enjoy yourself.”

 Visit & Shop with Elena on etsy:  NeighborKitty